Chassis and Fuel System Restoration

 
Last Updated 03-27-2009
 
This page covers the restoration of the chassis. After sandblasting at a local blaster, the chassis was epoxy primed, and painted with Eastwood’s Chassis Black paint. Was very happy with the Eastwood finish, but we will see how it holds up long term…..check back in a few years! Unfortunately the pictures of the early stages of chassis work are missing in action; if they are found, they will be added in. Thought for sure there was a pic of me spraying the finish coat on the frame, but I can’t find that either!

NOTE: Most if not all of these smaller pictures can be clicked to bring up BIG versions. After you view the big version, use your browser ‘back’ arrow to get back to the blog.

Here’s the earliest pic I could find of the frame; that is my younger son Robert in the picture, about 5 years ago:

extra-set-of-hands

Rear springs were disassembled, cleaned/blasted, painted, and reassembled with new rubber bushings. Man that spring pack is thick - may have to pull some leaves out later to help the ride. Rear axle looked great inside, just a good cleaning inside and a new gasket, and the cover went back on. The rear axle bearings and inner/outer seals were replaced, and the axle endplay was set per the Shop Manual. The whole axle was cleaned with a wire brush on a drill motor down to bare metal, primed with epoxy primer, and painted with Eastwood Chassis Black paint. Monroe Gas Magnum truck shocks were used in the back (as well as the front).

The truck was originally a six cylinder, but I wanted a V8.  In researching the parts book, it was determined that the only chassis difference was the front springs so NOS 8E7 front springs were purchased from Newman & Altman (before Dennis purchased the parts and formed SASCO). All new spring bushings, tie rod ends, shocks, etc were installed. The truck appeared to just had new kingpins installed, so those were retained. Had some trouble finding the tie rod ends for each side, but finally got some NOS TRW ends from a vendor at Charlotte AutoFair.

The steering box was rebuilt using all NOS parts. Below is a series of pictures documenting the steering box rebuild:

NOS steering box parts

NOS steering box parts

NOS post and bearings

NOS post and bearings

Post installed in steering box

Post installed in steering box

Instructions from the new post bearing kit

Instructions from the new post bearing kitNOS steering box bushings installed, and ready to ream them to size

Reaming bushings with an adjustable piloted reamer (borrowed from work)

Reaming bushings with an adjustable piloted reamer (borrowed from work)

A new roller assembly was installed in the arm, and torqued to specs using a small inch-pound torque wrench

A new roller assembly was installed in the arm, and torqued to specs using a small inch-pound torque wrench

Steering box reassembled with new oil seal; cover was then installed with a hand-cut gasket, and post endplay adjusted with shims per the shop manual

Steering box reassembled with new oil seal; cover was then installed with a hand-cut gasket, and post endplay adjusted with shims per the shop manual

The steering box was installed in the chassis (yes, I know the engine is in, but that is another page on the blog<G>):

steering-box-installed1

Next came the steering idler with a NOS bushing installed………steering-idler-parts

….and all the ’special’ 8E steering linkage is NOS too:

nos-steering-linkage1

BTW, all of these new parts came with an 8E12 (V8 with 5 speed OD tranny) truck that was purchased in about 1985. The owner had planned on keeping it “forever” and purchased every new part that he could from Avanti Parts in the late 1970’s, including a lot of duplicates. (For those Studebaker newbies, Avanti Parts was formed to purchase the parts inventory from Studebaker.) The engine from this 8E12 goes into my Champ too.

Here is a shot of the steering box installed:

steering-linkage-and-idler-installed

The tag  on the steering box is to remind me to fill the box with lube! Don’t know about the rest of you, but my projects stretch out so long that reminders like this are needed! The other tag is to remind me to torque the bolt for the steering linkage idler.

And a shot of the drivers side suspension:

passenger-side-front-suspension-and-brakes1

The shocks are Monroe Gas Magnum p/n 34905 gas charged truck shocks; used these on my ‘55 E7 pickup and they work great. The Turner disc brake conversion can be seen in this pic, and will have its own page since I have had so many requests for pics.

The gas tank was clean as a whistle inside, but was filthy and somewhat rusty (surface rust) on the outside.  A couple hours with a wire brush on a drill motor, and it was ready for coating using Eastwood’s Tank Tone spray.  I like this Eastwood Tank Tone. I is a zinc coating that sprays on. I topcoat it with clear for protection.

ready-to-install-gas-tank

With new attachment bolts, brackets cleaned up, and new insulators made from fabric reinforced rubber, the gas tank is ready to go on…….

26-gas-tank-hanger-parts

New gas tank gage and gasket, and the tank mounted in the frame:

installing-gas-tank-float

gas-tank-done

New fuel line was bent to match the original exactly:

new-fuel-lines-and-hardware1